Öhlins Racing and Exmet look to 3D printing of components from amorphous alloy powders

October 2, 2013

Exmet

A sample of Additive Manufactured amorphous

alloy from Exmet using EBM (Electron Beam Melting),

measuring 50x50x5mm. Samples with thickness of

20mm have been successfully manufactured using

DMLS (Direct Metal Laser Sintering)

Sweden’s Exmet AB and Öhlins Racing AB have signed a license agreement for the use of Exmet’s 3D printing technology to produce amorphous alloy components. Öhlins Racing develops and manufactures a range of components primarily for the motorsport and aftermarket segment, and it is hoped the use of amorphous alloys will lead to increased performance in a number of applications.

Amorphous alloys (also known as bulk metallic glasses) lack crystalline microstructure and have a number of unique properties. Iron-based amorphous alloys, ie. amorphous steels, have twice the strength and ten times the elasticity compared to high-quality steel alloys and four times the strength of titanium alloys. Amorphous alloys are also chemically resistant, i.e. they are stainless.

“We are very pleased that our strategy to target leading high-end technology companies now has begun to pay off”, stated Mattias Unosson, CEO of Exmet AB. “The agreement with Öhlins Racing will accelerate the technical development and commercialisation of our technology.”

Exmet1

The optical microscopy, along with XRD curve data,

confirms that the sample is amorphous

“This exciting materials technology from Exmet will allow our customers within motorsport to further sharpen their competitive edge”, added Lars Macklin, Vice President Conventional Systems at Öhlins Racing. “History shows that the success of Öhlins Racing is built on early adoption and application of new technologies, so this agreement is in line with our proven successful strategy.”

Exmet has managed to manufacture amorphous net shape components by metal powder bed additive manufacturing using either laser or electron beam based systems. The company state that their technology will increase the potential market for amorphous metals by removing some of the obstacles connected to the more traditional manufacturing methods of amorphous metal components.

www.exmet.se 

 

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